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Mobile Home Leveling: How and Why to Do It

mobile home leveling

Most of today’s mobile home communities are not the “trailer parks” that they used to be. In fact, mobile homes or manufactured homes are an inexpensive way for people to get started as a homeowner or as an inexpensive option for people looking to downsize or eliminate the steps in their traditional homes. They can also be lower to maintain compared to traditional single-family homes.

However, just like with a traditional house, a mobile home does need some maintenance over time. Many repairs can be done yourself or by a handy neighbor.

One thing you may eventually need to have done is have your mobile home re-leveled, especially if your home is new or you just moved into a new space or community. As the home settles, things may start to feel slightly off balance. You may notice things that are more than just normal creaky floorboards.

Does Your Mobile Home Need Leveling?

If your home is new or recently moved, there are some signs that it has settled and needs some readjusting. If you notice most of these things happening, it’s a rather certain indication that mobile home leveling is necessary.

  • Windows, cabinet doors and closet doors don’t close correctly or stay shut
  • Odd cracks in the walls, flooring or ceiling may be a sign that the home is under some stress
  • The skirting looks buckled
  • Awnings are bent or hard to use
  • The home looks slightly tilted when you look at it from the road

Why is Keeping Your Mobile Home Level Important?

If you don’t level the home after a period of time, wooden piers under your home may show signs of wear and tear. If the bolts are stressed in any way, they won’t be as effective in keeping the weight distributed evenly, which keeps the home level.

General Cost to Leveling Your Mobile Home

Mobile home leveling is not an ordinary DIY job. It’s strongly suggested that you contact a professional who knows how to level a mobile home so you know it’s being done correctly and prevent any damage being done to the home if it’s not properly leveled.

These are the approximate costs to level a mobile home. These costs may vary depending on where you live, the community you live in and the type of mobile home you have.

  • Single-wide: $450 – $550
  • Double-wide: $750 – $850
  • Triple-wide: $900 – $1,000

Checking the Level of the Home

As mentioned, leveling a mobile home is not a DIY project; however, you can check yourself to see if the home has shifted and needs leveling. If it does, then you should contact a professional to get the rest of the job done.

1. Safety is Critical

Make sure you have the proper work gloves and eyewear before you venture underneath your home. It’s strongly advised you have someone with you in case of an emergency. This isn’t something you want to do by yourself.

2. Remove the Skirting

Carefully disassemble and remove the skirting then loosen the tie-down straps.

3. Find the Current Level of the Home

Starting at the center, place your level in the center of the beam and check the bubble to see if it’s level. Move the level to the nearest support pier and check the bubble again.

Continue moving the level and checking the bubble to the end of the main support beam, then return the level to the center and check the other side of the home.

If any part of the home isn’t sitting level, then your mobile home needs adjusting to make it sit level again.

How to Level the Mobile Home Yourself

1. Raise the Support Beam

You’ll need the proper jack to raise the home to its level position. Be sure to place a piece of wood under the jack to stabilize it while you work. Jack up the house until the bubble is centered. You should see some space between the lower beam and its support.

2. Add Support to the Bottom of the Beam

You need to fill in that space so the beam stays raised and keeps the house level. A sturdy piece of wood, or a shim, is normally used. Hammer the shim into place and lower the jack. The beam should rest securely on the shim and the level should show that part of the house is even.

3. Plumbing and Water Lines

As you continue along the support beams and shim up any that indicate the house isn’t level in that area, make sure none of your important lines have been damaged or dislodged during the leveling process.

When you’re finished, recheck the whole beam again from end to end to make sure the entire house is level.

4. Reattach the Skirting

First, readjust the tie-down straps to make sure they’re secure, and reattach the skirting.

Planning on upgrading to a new home soon? At Palm Harbor Homes, we offer a wide variety of options to choose from. Whether it’s a single-wide home or a multi-wide, contact us and we’ll help you find your perfect home.

Most of today’s mobile home communities are not the “trailer parks” that they used to be. In fact, mobile homes or manufactured homes are an inexpensive way for people to get started as a homeowner. They can even be an inexpensive option for people looking to downsize or eliminate the steps in their traditional homes. One of their benefits is they can be easier to maintain compared to traditional single-family homes.

Just like with a traditional house, however, a mobile home does need some maintenance over time. Many repairs can be done yourself or by a handy neighbor.

One thing you may eventually need to have done is have your mobile home re-leveled, especially if your home is new or you just moved into a new space or community. As the home settles, things may start to feel slightly off balance. You may notice things that are more than just normal creaky floorboards.

Does Your Mobile Home Need Leveling?

If your home is new or recently moved, there are some signs that it has settled and needs some readjusting. If you notice most of these things happening, it’s a strong indication that mobile home leveling is necessary.

  • Windows, cabinet doors and closet doors don’t close correctly or stay shut
  • Odd cracks in the walls, flooring or ceiling may be a sign that the home is under some stress
  • The skirting looks buckled
  • Awnings are bent or hard to use
  • The home looks slightly tilted when you look at it from the road

Why is Keeping Your Mobile Home Level Important?

If you don’t level the home after a period of time, wooden piers under your home may show signs of wear and tear. If the bolts are stressed in any way, they won’t be as effective in keeping the weight distributed evenly, which keeps the home level.

General Cost to Leveling Your Mobile Home

Mobile home leveling is not an ordinary DIY job. It’s strongly suggested that you contact a professional who knows how to level a mobile home so you know it’s being done correctly and prevent any damage being done to the home if it’s not properly leveled.

These are the approximate costs to level a mobile home. These costs may vary depending on where you live, the community you live in and the type of mobile home you have.

  • Single-wide: $450 – $550
  • Double-wide: $750 – $850
  • Triple-wide: $900 – $1,000

Checking the Level of the Home

As mentioned, leveling a mobile home is not a DIY project; however, you can check yourself to see if the home has shifted and needs leveling. If it does, then you should contact a professional to get the rest of the job done.

1. Safety is Critical

Make sure you have the proper work gloves and eyewear before you venture underneath your home. It’s strongly advised you have someone with you in case of an emergency. This isn’t something you want to do by yourself.

2. Remove the Skirting

Carefully disassemble and remove the skirting then loosen the tie-down straps.

3. Find the Current Level of the Home

Starting at the center, place your level in the center of the beam and check the bubble to see if it’s level. Move the level to the nearest support pier and check the bubble again.

Continue moving the level and checking the bubble to the end of the main support beam, then return the level to the center and check the other side of the home.

If any part of the home isn’t sitting level, then your mobile home needs adjusting to make it sit level again.

How to Level the Mobile Home Yourself

1. Raise the Support Beam

You’ll need the proper jack to raise the home to its level position. Be sure to place a piece of wood under the jack to stabilize it while you work. Jack up the house until the bubble is centered. You should see some space between the lower beam and its support.

2. Add Support to the Bottom of the Beam

You need to fill in that space so the beam stays raised and keeps the house level. A sturdy piece of wood, or a shim, is normally used. Hammer the shim into place and lower the jack. The beam should rest securely on the shim and the level should show that part of the house is even.

3. Plumbing and Water Lines

As you continue along the support beams and shim up any that indicate the house isn’t level in that area, make sure none of your important lines have been damaged or dislodged during the leveling process.

When you’re finished, recheck the whole beam again from end to end to make sure the entire house is level.

4. Reattach the Skirting

First, readjust the tie-down straps to make sure they’re secure, and reattach the skirting.

Planning on upgrading to a new home soon? At Palm Harbor Homes, we offer a wide variety of options to choose from. Whether it’s a single-wide home or a multi-wide, contact us and we’ll help you find your perfect home.